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FAQ: How important is proper sensor position and secure attachment?

FAQ: How important is proper sensor position and secure attachment?

By Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder, DVM | Updated on | Equipment, Head Sensor Guidance, Instrumentation, LT Schroeder, Pelvic Sensor Guidance, RF Sensor Guidance

  Answer: Sensor positioning is important due to the necessary orientation of the sensing element (accelerometer or gyroscope) inside of the sensor device relative to the horse. But more specifically, each sensor has a somewhat different level of “forgiveness” in terms of the importance of precise positioning. RF SENSOR The right forelimb sensor contains a gyroscope, which should be placed on the dorsal midline of the RF pastern. It measures angular velocity of the distal limb in the sagittal plane. Because of this, rotation of the sensor too far off midline will affect the output of the gyro signal....

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User Tip: How to Use the Equinosis Q Pelvic Sensor Pad & Pelvic Clip Kit

User Tip: How to Use the Equinosis Q Pelvic Sensor Pad & Pelvic Clip Kit

By Equinosis Logo Equinosis Staff | Updated on | Equinosis Staff, Equipment, FAQ, Instrumentation

The Pelvic Sensor Pad provides two options and functions for pelvic sensor attachment. It provides additional surface area for the Pelvic Clip to grab and hold. It provides a secure, dry surface for Dual Lock tape to adhere. NOTE: The Pelvic Sensor Pad replaced the previous method of Pelvic Sensor attachment (Gaffer’s tape), making sensor attachment easier, faster, less expensive, and more aesthetic. Pelvic Sensor Pad Placement Make sure the horse is standing SQUARE in hind limbs. Locate the most dorsal aspect of the midline of the horse between the sacral tuberosities. Adhere the pad across...

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FAQ: What do the different sensor lights mean?

FAQ: What do the different sensor lights mean?

By Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder, DVM | Updated on | Equipment, Instrumentation, LT Schroeder, Sensor Guidance, User Tip

Turning on Sensors: Green LED flickers (blinks) at a fast rate: Magnet is Turning Sensor On or Off Green LED flickers at a moderate, steady rate: Ready to connect Green LED solid or flickering (blinking) at a slow rate / doesn’t respond to magnet: Connected to Lameness Locator Green LED flickers momentarily and shuts off: Needs charged  You followed the instructions on how to turn on your sensor, but the Green LED doesn’t appear: Needs charged  On Charging Station: Red LED is Solid: Charging Red LED light turns off: Fully Charged Sensor is properly placed on station, but Red LED light does not turn on: Contact Us

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FAQ: How Do I Check My Tablet's Specs?

FAQ: How Do I Check My Tablet's Specs?

By Equinosis Logo Equinosis Staff | Updated on | Equinosis Staff, Equipment, FAQ

Select which version of Windows you have: Windows 7  Your "Start" button will look like this:   Click here to view Windows 7 Instructions Windows 8 Do you have the Windows icon instead of a start button? When you click the windows button, do you get a tile screen? You’re on Windows 8 then. Click here to view Windows 8 Instructions Windows 10 Your "Start" button will look like little windows: Click here to view Windows 10 Instructions Windows 7  1. Click Start  2. Right Click on Computer   To right click with stylus, click and hold with stylus until a...

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User Tip: A Word about Sensor Charging and Battery Care

User Tip: A Word about Sensor Charging and Battery Care

By Equinosis Logo Equinosis Staff | Updated on | Equinosis Staff, Equipment, Sensor Guidance, User Tip

Many customers ask about sensor life, routine charging, and what to expect as the sensors age.  Equinosis sensors are made with Lithium Polymer batteries currently manufactured by PowerStream. Lithium Polymer is a higher quality subset of a broader class of Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries. The component used has a specified life of 500 cycles - where after 500 cycles, greater than 70% of initial capacity is retained during laboratory testing conditions. However, in the field, “cycle” is an elusive term as it depends on several factors. And 500 is even more elusive as that is a lower specification limit.  So, the average...

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FAQ: How do I turn on/off Gen5 sensors?

FAQ: How do I turn on/off Gen5 sensors?

By Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder, DVM | Updated on | Equipment, Instrumentation, LT Schroeder, Sensor Guidance, User Tip

Please be advised that some Generation 5 sensors may turn on differently than your other sensors, depending on the ship date of your original sensors. TO TURN THE SENSOR ON: wave/pass magnet near the Magnetic Switch until the Green LED starts to blink. TO TURN THE SENSOR OFF: HOLD the magnet STEADY in the same area for approximately 6 seconds. 

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FAQ: How to Check For Proper Driver Settings for Sena UD100 Bluetooth Adapter

FAQ: How to Check For Proper Driver Settings for Sena UD100 Bluetooth Adapter

By Equinosis Logo Equinosis Staff | Updated on | Data Storage, Equinosis Staff, Equipment

DOWNLOAD INSTRUCTIONS 1. Plug in a UD100 Bluetooth adapter.   2. RIGHT CLICK (press and hold) the Windows Start button in the lower left corner and select “Device Manager”. You can also search for “Device Manager” in “Search”.   3. DOUBLE CLICK on “Bluetooth”. If it shows “Generic Bluetooth Radio”, you need to change this to “Generic Bluetooth Adapter”.   4. RIGHT CLICK (press and hold) on “Generic Bluetooth Radio”. Select “Update Driver”.   5. Select “Browse my computer for driver software” (2nd option).   6. Select “Let me pick from a list…” (2nd Option).   7. Select “Generic Bluetooth Adapter”. Once...

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User Tip: Bluetooth & Sensor Connection Guide

User Tip: Bluetooth & Sensor Connection Guide

By Kevin Keegan Kevin G. Keegan, DVM, MS, DACVS | Updated on | Bluetooth Troubleshooting, Equipment, Instrumentation, KG Keegan, Sensor Troubleshooting, User Tip

If you ever have trouble connecting to your sensors or experience sensor lag (sensors plotting asynchronously across the screen) as horse gets farther away, the following is a quick check list to run through for possible reasons.  For more in-depth troubleshooting, click HERE to view the complete Bluetooth® Sensor troubleshooting guide. Check that your sensors are sufficiently charged and turned on. If you have more than one set of sensors in your system, make sure you are attempting to connect to the correct set. If any sensor is a new replacement, the sensor must be programmed into the system (contact...

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FAQ: Can the Pastern Sensor Be Worn on A Different Limb or Location on the Right Forelimb?

FAQ: Can the Pastern Sensor Be Worn on A Different Limb or Location on the Right Forelimb?

By Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder, DVM | Updated on | Equipment, Instrumentation, LT Schroeder, RF Sensor Guidance, Sensor Guidance

What can be done if the right front pastern is not suitable for attaching the wrap and sensor – for instance on a horse with extremely irritated pastern dermatitis?  Can the sensor be worn on a different limb or location on the right forelimb? A: The RF gyro signal indicates the timing of right forelimb stance, which is used as a reference point for all head and pelvic movement asymmetry calculations in the analysis. The gyro measures angular velocity associated with the movement of the pastern.  REMINDER: Placement of the sensor in the NORMAL ORIENTATION (dorsal aspect, right side up) on...

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FAQ: What do you recommend for keeping the pelvic sensor secure on sweaty horses?

FAQ: What do you recommend for keeping the pelvic sensor secure on sweaty horses?

By Equinosis Logo Equinosis Staff | Updated on | Equinosis Staff, Equipment, Instrumentation, Pelvic Sensor Guidance, Sweaty Horse

A: If the horse has long enough hair, then the pelvic clip can often be used alone on sweaty or wet horses. But if the hair is not long enough, or you find that you are not getting good grip with the clips, then use the pelvic sensor pads with some additional preparation. It is always best to start with a clean, dry horse.Before the horse sweats, spray a human or veterinary medical grade adhesive on the area of the tuber sacrale where the pelvic sensor pad will be placed. Let it dry. *If the horse is already...

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FAQ: Does the RF sensor cause artefactual lameness?

FAQ: Does the RF sensor cause artefactual lameness?

By Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder, DVM | Updated on | Equipment, FAQ, LT Schroeder, RF Sensor Guidance, Sensor Guidance

A: This is a commonly asked question from horse owners to their veterinarians, especially if their horse measures with a right forelimb lameness.  The effect of the right forelimb sensor on measurement of lameness has been thoroughly tested.  The right forelimb wrap and pastern sensor do not create artefactual lameness. The sensors weigh less than 30 grams, which is quite inconsequential to a horse. The wrap, while applied snugly, should not be applied so tight that it causes irritation to the horse. Another important consideration regarding the pastern wrap, is that even if the presence of the wrap...

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FAQ: Why don’t we put sensors on the limbs to measure limb movement?

FAQ: Why don’t we put sensors on the limbs to measure limb movement?

By Equinosis Logo Equinosis Staff | Updated on | Equinosis Staff, Equipment, FAQ, RF Sensor Guidance, Sensor Guidance

Photo credit: TheHorse.com ­A: While the Equinosis Q does use one sensor on the right forelimb, it is not to quantify lameness, but only to indicate right forelimb stance. There is much evidence in the literature to support that limb movement, whether it include many joint angle changes, stride length, amount of limb protraction or retraction, the shape of the hoof flight trajectory, the amount of limb abduction and adduction of the limb, etc… is less SENSITIVE and SPECIFIC than vertical motion of the torso. This is due to the greater stride-by-stride variability of these other parameters. These movement parameters...

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FAQ: What is the best way to clean the head and fetlock wraps of my Equinosis Q?

FAQ: What is the best way to clean the head and fetlock wraps of my Equinosis Q?

By Equinosis Logo Equinosis Staff | Updated on | Equinosis Staff, Equipment, FAQ, How to Clean Sensor Wraps, Sensor Guidance

A: If the wraps seem to get dirty after every use, simply rinse them, let dry overnight, and machine wash once a week or as needed. The wraps will wear out over time and should be replaced if you see signs of wear on the Velcro or stitching.  Under normal use, we recommend replacing the wraps yearly to maintain secure and safe attachment of the sensors to the horse. Order replacement components at equinosis.myshopify.com/collections/sensor-attachment-accessories. Take the following steps to properly clean and care for your Q’s head bumper and pastern wrap: Precautions Our Wraps DO NOT contain latex. Allergic reactions generally...

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FAQ: Why can't I buy any tablet and put Lameness Locator on it?

FAQ: Why can't I buy any tablet and put Lameness Locator on it?

By Updated on | Bluetooth, Equipment, FAQ

The Lameness Locator program has specific computing requirements to work well. In addition, because the Bluetooth radio is an integral component in data acquisition, certain “imaging” requirements specific to the device are required. And, because technology is always changing and advancing – whether hardware like the Bluetooth transceiver, or 3rd party software like MATLAB – it takes significant programming and maintenance simply to keep up. At this time, Equinosis can only support a limited number of platforms. However, Equinosis is moving in the direction of one day being able to run LL algorithms in the cloud, so any device with...

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FAQ: How often should I replace my pastern wrap and head bumper?

FAQ: How often should I replace my pastern wrap and head bumper?

By Updated on | Equipment, FAQ

The sensor attachments use excellent, durable and weather resistant materials of neoprene and textile-grade Velcro.  However, similar to any product using these materials, they will wear out with time, use, and exposure.  As the wraps are relatively inexpensive compared to the broken or lost sensor there are designed to protect, we recommend you replace them if you see signs of wear or loss of Velcro holding power.  Depending on the volume of usage and UV exposure, it is prudent to inspect and/or replace annually.

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