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When Subjective Opinion Disagrees with Inertial Sensor Measurements

When Subjective Opinion Disagrees with Inertial Sensor Measurements

By Kevin Keegan Kevin G. Keegan, DVM, MS, DACVS | Updated on | Data Collection, Data Interpretation, Editorial, KG Keegan, Objective vs. Subjective Opinion, OES Members Only

Whenever I use the Equinosis Q, which is on every lameness case, treatment checkup, or pre-purchase, I also always do a subjective lameness evaluation, determining and often times declaring my subjective impression regarding where (i.e. which limb or limbs) I think the lameness is. Sometimes there is disagreement between my subjective opinion and the results of the inertial sensors. What is my take on this? The short and easy answer is, "I was probably wrong". This happens occasionally and it no longer bothers me or my clients, or the students or house officers I am training. I am...

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An Inside Look At Objective Evaluation: All-Access Investigation of the Equinosis Q

An Inside Look At Objective Evaluation: All-Access Investigation of the Equinosis Q

By Nancy Loving Nancy S. Loving, DVM, Loving Equine Clinic | Updated on | Editorial, NS Loving, Objective vs. Subjective Opinion

FEB 2019 - As equine veterinarians, we are all too familiar with the challenges of diagnosing lameness and formulating a treatment plan. This winter I had a chance to learn hands on about a device that might change the whole paradigm of lameness evaluation. It’s called the Q with Lameness Locator, developed over the last three decades by Kevin Keegan, DVM, MS, DACVS at the University of Missouri. This device provides evidence-based, objective lameness measurement. Admittedly, after performing three decades of lameness work that relied primarily on subjective evaluation, I was skeptical as to the value of the Q....

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Man with Machine Versus Man Without Machine: Debunking the Myths

Man with Machine Versus Man Without Machine: Debunking the Myths

By Kevin Keegan Kevin G. Keegan, DVM, MS, DACVS | Updated on | Editorial, KG Keegan, Objective vs. Subjective Opinion, OES Members Only

The Debate: A debate continues to fester around the topic of comparing subjective to objective evaluation of lameness.  The problem is, in its current form, the debate is not a genuine examination of the appropriate question – what is the most transparent and, therefore, best information that can be provided to horse owners? Instead the debate has been oddly twisted to pit man VERSUS machine – as if every new machine replaces the man, instead of complimenting his or her abilities, like the microscope, or telescope, or the wheel! Unfortunately, this debate further devolves into mischaracterizations and falsehoods,...

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Redefine Lameness? Accommodating the Layman’s Perspective on Lameness

Redefine Lameness? Accommodating the Layman’s Perspective on Lameness

By Kevin Keegan Kevin G. Keegan, DVM, MS, DACVS | Andy Wolter Andy Wolter, Equinosis CEO | Updated on | A Wolter, Editorial, KG Keegan, Objective vs. Subjective Opinion, OES Members Only

Precision lameness measurement is again challenging our conceptions of “sound” and “lame”. Earlier this year, the threshold and demarcation of “measurable” lameness was brought into question. In the July edition of Eye on Objectivity, Dr. Keegan made the case for maintaining the Q thresholds and not compromising instrument sensitivity (read now). This fall, both Modern Equine Vet and The Horse featured articles covering a recently published editorial in EVJ, questioning the clinical definition of lameness itself (read now). Clinicians seem to agree that lameness IS a clinical sign; but, when 4.5 million horse owners in the U.S. have a different understanding, the discussion...

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What Are You Trying to Measure?

What Are You Trying to Measure?

By Kevin Keegan Kevin G. Keegan, DVM, MS, DACVS | Updated on | Editorial, KG Keegan, Objective vs. Subjective Opinion, OES Members Only

Kevin G. Keegan, DVM, MS, Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Surgeons I often get asked by colleagues and fellow equine lameness investigators to compare inertial sensors to other methods of objective lameness measurement. My question in return is, “What are you trying to measure?" In my honest opinion, if you are only interested in measuring lameness in horses, for whatever reason, then the only way to do it practically today is with body-mounted inertial sensors. If you are interested in measuring something else, for example rider position on the horse, limb movement effects with shoeing, or if you are interested...

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